Plane Cross-Reference

The table below provides a cross-reference for the common size bench planes manufactured by Stanley, Millers Falls, Sargent, and Record.

Bench Plane Cross-Reference
Type Length Iron Width Stanley Millers Falls Sargent Record
Smooth 5 1/2 in. 1 1/4 in. 1 None None None
Smooth 7 in. 1 5/8 in. 2 7 407 None
Smooth 7 in. 1 5/8 in. 2C None None None
Smooth 8 in. 1 3/4 in. 3 8 408 03
Smooth 8 in. 1 3/4 in. 3C 8C 408C 03C
Smooth 9 in. 2 in. 4 9 409 04
Smooth 9 in. 2 in. 4C 9C 409C 04C
Smooth 10 in. 2 3/8 in. 4 1/2 10 410 04 1/2
Smooth 10 in. 2 3/8 in. 4 1/2C 10C 410C 04 1/2C
Smooth 10 in. 2 3/8 in. 4 1/2H None None None
Fore 11 1/2 in. 1 3/4 in. 5 1/4 11 None None
Fore 11 1/2 in. 1 3/4 in. 5 1/4C None None None
Fore 13 in. 1 5/8 in. None None None T5
Fore 14 in. 2 in. 5 14 414 05
Fore 14 in. 2 in. 5C 14C 414C 05C
Fore 15 in. 2 3/8 in. 5 1/2 15 415 05 1/2
Fore 15 in. 2 3/8 in. 5 1/2C 15C 415C 05 1/2C
Fore 15 in. 2 3/8 in. 5 1/2H None None None
Fore 18 in. 2 3/8 in. 6 18 418 06
Fore 18 in. 2 3/8 in. 6C 18C 418C 06C
Jointer 22 in. 2 3/8 in. 7 22 422 07
Jointer 22 in. 2 3/8 in. 7C 22C 422C 07C
Jointer 24 in. 2 5/8 in. 8 24 424 08
Jointer 24 in. 2 5/8 in. 8C 24C 424C 08C

6 Responses to Plane Cross-Reference

  1. Sheldon Sanders says:

    Why not refer to the No.5 as a jack plane? That is traditional, is it not?

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    • Bryant Rice says:

      Very good question. Traditionally, fore planes were about 14″ to 18″ long, which would include the Jack plane. The term Jack, as you probably know, is most likely derived from “jack of all trades.” However, it doesn’t really matter. The terms Fore, Joynter, and Smoothing plane reflect how they were used and the functions they each served. I think Jack is a slang term. So, while it’s perfectly acceptable to call it a Jack plane, it is my personal belief that the more traditional term for the 14″ plane is Fore. Of course, this is all conjecture and I could be wrong.

      Technically, any length bench plane can be used for any function, as long as it’s set up correctly. So, and Jack can be set up to be a Fore plane, a Jointer, or a Smoother.

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  2. David Howell says:

    I was reading the fine print in the picture on your terminology page. It appears in 1929 that Stanley referred to 5 and 5 1/2 planes as Jack planes and the 5 1/4 as the Junior Jack. That leads me to believe it wasn’t just a slang term. Either way is good with me, a rose by any other name….

    A side note: thank you for putting together a very informative site.

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    • Bryant says:

      One of the earliest published references to “Jack” plane is Joseph Moxon’s Mechanick Exercises from 1703, so the term was well established (whether slang or other origin) long before 1929. It might just be one of those enduring mysteries that is never completely sorted out.

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  3. gblogswild says:

    Millers Falls did not make an 11C.

    Like

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